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dispensational premillennialism

This tag is associated with 2 posts

Sunday Quote!- Does 1 Corinthians 15 teach a Millennial Gap?

kc-stormsEvery Sunday, I will share a quote from something I’ve been reading. The hope is for you, dear reader, to share your thoughts on the quote and related issues and perhaps pick up some reading material along the way!

Does 1 Corinthians 15 teach a Millennial Gap?

Sam Storms’ Kingdom Come: The Amillennial Alternative is a major work written in defense of amillennialism–the eschatological (end times) position that there is no 1000 year earthly reign of Christ but rather that the millennium is the church era (among other things). One argument premillennialists use to defend one aspect of their position is that 1 Corinthians 15:22-28. Because there is a gap between Christ’s resurrection and the resurrection of believers, premillennial believers argue that there can also be a gap between the resurrection of Christ’s people and “the end” in verse 24.

Sam Storms analyzes this argument in extended fashion. Here’s a snippet of his discussion:

The premillennialist argues that the “end” [in verse 24] is the end or close of the millennial age, 1000 years after Christ has returned to earth. The amillennialist argues that the “end” is the end or close of the present church age… all one need do is demonstrate which of these two options is correct… So, does Paul tell us when death dies? …As I read 1 Corinthians 15:50-58, the defeat of death occurs at the second coming of Christ… (145, cited below)

If it is the case that Christ’s second coming is indeed the “end,” then it follows that the premillennial interpretation is mistaken and indeed, Storms argues, the whole system mostly collapses on itself. Storms concludes that 1 Corinthians 15 cannot be used to support the notion of a millennial gap.

What do you think? Does 1 Corinthians allow for such a lengthy gap in between parts of the text? What eschatological position do you hold to? How damaging is this text–if at all–for various eschatological positions?

No matter what you think, Kingdom Come: The Amillennial Alternative is cogently argued and something that anyone interested in eschatology should own and read.

Links

Be sure to check out the page for this site on Facebook and Twitter for discussion of posts, links to other pages of interest, random talk about theology/philosophy/apologetics/movies and more!

Sunday Quote– If you want to read more Sunday Quotes and join the discussion, check them out! (Scroll down for more)

Source

Sam Storms, Kingdom Come: The Amillennial Alternative (Scotland: Mentor, 2013).

SDG.

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Question of the Week- What’s your view of “The Millennium”?

ca-riddlebargerEach Week on Saturday, I’ll be asking a “Question of the Week.” I’d love your input and discussion! Ask a good question in the comments and it may show up as the next week’s question! I may answer the questions in the comments myself.

What’s Your View of “The Millennium”

There are few in-house debates which are as divided among Christians as issues related to eschatology. I’m curious as to what views my readers take on various eschatological themes, so I figured I’d ask! Before we ask the question, here’s a brief outline of different views about “The Millennium”:

[P]remillennialism… claims that the return of Christ precedes the millennium [as an actual 1000 year reign of Christ on Earth], postmillennialism… holds that Christ returns after the millennium… amillenialism.. holds that the millennium is not limited to a thousand years but includes the entire period of time between the first and second comings of Christ (Riddlebarger, 19, cited below)

There are seemingly endless permutations of how these different views may be hashed out, but I’m curious:

What is your view of the Millennium? Will it be a literal 1000 years, or is it some finite, but undetermined period of time? Will Christ come before or after it?

Eschatology– the study of the end times- is not something I’ve focused on much at this blog (though you may read what I have written by clicking on the word) for a few reasons. The most prominent is that I haven’t studied it much. This makes me curious: which view do you hold and why? Let me know in the comments.

Links

Be sure to check out the page for this site on Facebook and Twitter for discussion of posts, links to other pages of interest, random talk about theology/philosophy/apologetics/movies and more.

Question of the Week– Check out other questions and give me some answers

Book Review: “Four Views on the Book of Revelation” (Zondervan Counterpoints Series)– I review a book which focuses upon Revelation–the book of the Bible which is most commonly associated with eschatology. Check it out for a survey of four views on how to read the book alongside various eschatological views.

Source

Kim Riddlebarger, A Case for Amillenialism (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books, 2003).

– I chose this specific book because it featured a concise outline of the three most prominent views on the millennium.

SDG.

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